Pair your accounts.

Export articles to Mendeley

Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

Pair your accounts.

Export articles to Mendeley

Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

You’ve supercharged your research process with ACS and Mendeley!

STEP 1:
Click to create an ACS ID

Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

MENDELEY PAIRING EXPIRED
Your Mendeley pairing has expired. Please reconnect
ACS Publications. Most Trusted. Most Cited. Most Read
My Activity
CONTENT TYPES

Determination of the Physical Properties of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids Using a Love Wave Device

View Author Information
School of Science & Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS, U.K.
QUILL Centre, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Queen’s University, Belfast, Belfast BT9 5AG, U.K.
§ Department of Chemical & Process Engineering, University of Sheffield, Newcastle Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, U.K.
Cite this: Anal. Chem. 2011, 83, 17, 6717–6721
Publication Date (Web):July 25, 2011
https://doi.org/10.1021/ac2013288
Copyright © 2011 American Chemical Society

    Article Views

    608

    Altmetric

    -

    Citations

    LEARN ABOUT THESE METRICS
    Other access options

    Abstract

    Abstract Image

    In this work, we have shown that a 100 MHz Love wave device can be used to determine whether room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are Newtonian fluids and have developed a technique that allows the determination of the density–viscosity product, ρη, of a Newtonian RTIL. In addition, a test for a Newtonian response was established by relating the phase change to insertion loss change. Five concentrations of a water-miscible RTIL and seven pure RTILs were measured. The changes in phase and insertion loss were found to vary linearly with the square root of the density–viscosity product for values up to (ρη)1/2 ∼ 10 kg m–2 s–1/2. The square root of the density–viscosity product was deduced from the changes in either phase or insertion loss using glycerol as a calibration liquid. In both cases, the deduced values of ρη agree well with those measured using viscosity and density meters. Miniaturization of the device, beyond that achievable with the lower-frequency quartz crystal microbalance approach, to measure smaller volumes is possible. The ability to fabricate Love wave and other surface acoustic wave sensors using planar metallization technologies gives potential for future integration into lab-on-a-chip analytical systems for characterizing ionic liquids.

    Read this article

    To access this article, please review the available access options below.

    Get instant access

    Purchase Access

    Read this article for 48 hours. Check out below using your ACS ID or as a guest.

    Recommended

    Access through Your Institution

    You may have access to this article through your institution.

    Your institution does not have access to this content. You can change your affiliated institution below.

    Cited By

    This article is cited by 6 publications.

    1. Filipa Lima, Luis C. Branco, Armando J.D. Silvestre, Isabel M. Marrucho. Deep desulfurization of fuels: Are deep eutectic solvents the alternative for ionic liquids?. Fuel 2021, 293 , 120297. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fuel.2021.120297
    2. Anastasios G. Samarentsis, Alexandros K. Pantazis, Achilleas Tsortos, Jean-Michel Friedt, Electra Gizeli. Hybrid Sensor Device for Simultaneous Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface Acoustic Wave Measurements. Sensors 2020, 20 (21) , 6177. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20216177
    3. Vasilios Raptis, Achilleas Tsortos, Electra Gizeli. Theoretical Aspects of a Discrete-Binding Approach in Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Acoustic Biosensing. Physical Review Applied 2019, 11 (3) https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.11.034031
    4. Xi Zhang, Yingchang Zou, Chao An, Kejing Ying, Xing Chen, Ping Wang. A miniaturized immunosensor platform for automatic detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in EBC. Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical 2014, 205 , 94-101. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2014.08.011
    5. María Belén Serrano‐Santos, Ana Corres Ortega, Thomas Schäfer. Interfaces Based on Carbon Nanotubes, Ionic Liquids and Polymer Matrices for Sensing and Membrane Separation Applications. 2014, 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119028642.ch1
    6. Rafael Martínez-Palou, Rafael Luque. Applications of ionic liquids in the removal of contaminants from refinery feedstocks: an industrial perspective. Energy Environ. Sci. 2014, 7 (8) , 2414-2447. https://doi.org/10.1039/C3EE43837F