ACS Publications. Most Trusted. Most Cited. Most Read
My Activity
CONTENT TYPES

Figure 1Loading Img

Distribution of Particles in Human Stem Cell-Derived 3D Neuronal Cell Models: Effect of Particle Size, Charge, and Density

  • Ewa Czuba-Wojnilowicz
    Ewa Czuba-Wojnilowicz
    ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and the Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
  • Sara Miellet
    Sara Miellet
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, Molecular Horizons, School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522, Australia
    More by Sara Miellet
  • Agata Glab
    Agata Glab
    ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and the Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    More by Agata Glab
  • Serena Viventi
    Serena Viventi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
  • Francesca Cavalieri
    Francesca Cavalieri
    ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and the Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
  • Christina Cortez-Jugo*
    Christina Cortez-Jugo
    ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and the Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    *Email: [email protected]
  • Mirella Dottori*
    Mirella Dottori
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, Molecular Horizons, School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522, Australia
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    *Email: [email protected]
  • , and 
  • Frank Caruso*
    Frank Caruso
    ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, and the Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    *Email: [email protected]
    More by Frank Caruso
Cite this: Biomacromolecules 2020, 21, 8, 3186–3196
Publication Date (Web):July 29, 2020
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.biomac.0c00626
Copyright © 2020 American Chemical Society

    Article Views

    572

    Altmetric

    -

    Citations

    LEARN ABOUT THESE METRICS
    Other access options
    Supporting Info (1)»

    Abstract

    Abstract Image

    Neurodegenerative diseases are generally characterized by a progressive loss of neuronal subpopulations, with no available cure to date. One of the main reasons for the limited clinical outcomes of new drug formulations is the lack of appropriate in vitro human cell models for research and validation. Stem cell technologies provide an opportunity to address this challenge by using patient-derived cells as a platform to test various drug formulations, including particle-based drug carriers. The therapeutic efficacy of drug delivery systems relies on efficient cellular uptake of the carrier and can be dependent on its size, shape, and surface chemistry. Although considerable efforts have been made to understand the effects of the physiochemical properties of particles on two-dimensional cell culture models, little is known of their effect in three-dimensional (3D) cell models of neurodegenerative diseases. Herein, we investigated the role of particle size (235–1000 nm), charge (cationic and anionic), and density (1.05 and 1.8 g cm–3) on the interactions of particles with human embryonic stem cell-derived 3D cell cultures of sensory neurons, called sensory neurospheres (sNSP). Templated layer-by-layer particles, with silica or polystyrene cores, and self-assembled glycogen/DNA polyplexes were used. Particles with sizes <280 nm effectively penetrated sNSP. Additionally, effective plasmid DNA delivery was observed up to 6 days post-transfection with glycogen/DNA polyplexes. The findings provide guidance in nanoparticle design for therapies aimed at neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Friedreich’s ataxia, whereby sensory neurons are predominantly affected. They also demonstrate the application of 3D models of human sensory neurons in preclinical drug development.

    Read this article

    To access this article, please review the available access options below.

    Get instant access

    Purchase Access

    Read this article for 48 hours. Check out below using your ACS ID or as a guest.

    Recommended

    Access through Your Institution

    You may have access to this article through your institution.

    Your institution does not have access to this content. You can change your affiliated institution below.

    Supporting Information

    ARTICLE SECTIONS
    Jump To

    The Supporting Information is available free of charge at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.biomac.0c00626.

    • Confocal microscopy images of coated Si and PS particles; AFM image of BD-EDA nanoparticles; flow cytometry data showing the comparison of static versus dynamic incubation conditions; gray scale confocal images of sNSP cross sections after incubation with positively charged and negatively charged Si and PS particles of various sizes; transfection of sNSP with BD-EDA/DNA and BG-EDA particles; normalized MFI of EGFP expression 4 days post-transfection of sNSP with frataxin-EGFP-expressing plasmid (FXN_M23); and MIRIBEL checklist including material characterization, biological characterization, and experimental details (PDF)

    Terms & Conditions

    Most electronic Supporting Information files are available without a subscription to ACS Web Editions. Such files may be downloaded by article for research use (if there is a public use license linked to the relevant article, that license may permit other uses). Permission may be obtained from ACS for other uses through requests via the RightsLink permission system: http://pubs.acs.org/page/copyright/permissions.html.

    Cited By

    This article is cited by 4 publications.

    1. Cristina Casadidio, Jet E. M. Hartman, Bárbara S. Mesquita, Ragna Haegebaert, Katrien Remaut, Myriam Neumann, Jaimie Hak, Roberta Censi, Piera Di Martino, Wim E. Hennink, Tina Vermonden. Effect of Polyplex Size on Penetration into Tumor Spheroids. Molecular Pharmaceutics 2023, 20 (11) , 5515-5531. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.3c00397
    2. Marcin Wojnilowicz, Petra Laznickova, Yi Ju, Ching-Seng Ang, Federico Tidu, Kamila Bendickova, Giancarlo Forte, Magdalena Plebanski, Frank Caruso, Francesca Cavalieri, Jan Fric. Influence of protein corona on the interaction of glycogen–siRNA constructs with ex vivo human blood immune cells. Biomaterials Advances 2022, 140 , 213083. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bioadv.2022.213083
    3. Agata Radziwon, Sukhvir K. Bhangu, Soraia Fernandes, Christina Cortez-Jugo, Robert De Rose, Brendan Dyett, Marcin Wojnilowicz, Petra Laznickova, Jan Fric, Giancarlo Forte, Frank Caruso, Francesca Cavalieri. Triggering the nanophase separation of albumin through multivalent binding to glycogen for drug delivery in 2D and 3D multicellular constructs. Nanoscale 2022, 14 (9) , 3452-3466. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1NR08429A
    4. Christina Cortez‐Jugo, Ewa Czuba‐Wojnilowicz, Abigail Tan, Frank Caruso. A Focus on “Bio” in Bio–Nanoscience: The Impact of Biological Factors on Nanomaterial Interactions. Advanced Healthcare Materials 2021, 10 (16) https://doi.org/10.1002/adhm.202100574

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    You’ve supercharged your research process with ACS and Mendeley!

    STEP 1:
    Click to create an ACS ID

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    MENDELEY PAIRING EXPIRED
    Your Mendeley pairing has expired. Please reconnect