ACS Publications. Most Trusted. Most Cited. Most Read
My Activity
CONTENT TYPES

Figure 1Loading Img

Freight on a Low-Carbon Diet: Accessibility, Freightsheds, and Commodities

View Author Information
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, United States
*Phone: (510) 486-4507; e-mail: [email protected]
Cite this: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2015, 49, 19, 11321–11328
Publication Date (Web):September 4, 2015
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b01697
Copyright © 2015 American Chemical Society

    Article Views

    596

    Altmetric

    -

    Citations

    LEARN ABOUT THESE METRICS
    Other access options
    Supporting Info (1)»

    Abstract

    Abstract Image

    The freight infrastructure network (e.g., roads, railways, waterways, etc.) is the backbone of nearly all trade partnerships in the United States and abroad. The manner in which the individual portions of its constituent parts are interrelated or arranged plays an important role for determining the environmental footprint of goods moved within the network. Herein, we compare the spatial distribution of potential consumer–producer exchanges (i.e., accessibility) under varying greenhouse gas (GHG) budgets or preferences for minimal transportation-related GHG emissions. We conduct case studies using two freight modes (truck and intermodal rail) for two representative commodities: meat/seafood and paper articles. Results across all counties in the United States indicate that the geographic area in which trade is possible, given a GHG budget, varies by transportation mode, location, and commodity. Our results suggest that intermodal terminal availability is an important determinant of low-GHG accessibility. Since only a fraction of road-to-rail terminals accommodate meat/seafood (4.9%) and paper (0.7%), the United States could increase its expected GHG savings associated with truck-to-rail mode-switching policies by 70% (+20 kg CO2,e/ton for meat/seafood) and 310% (+30 kg CO2,e/ton for paper) by upgrading current terminals to allow the exchange of all types of goods.

    Read this article

    To access this article, please review the available access options below.

    Get instant access

    Purchase Access

    Read this article for 48 hours. Check out below using your ACS ID or as a guest.

    Recommended

    Access through Your Institution

    You may have access to this article through your institution.

    Your institution does not have access to this content. You can change your affiliated institution below.

    Supporting Information

    ARTICLE SECTIONS
    Jump To

    The Supporting Information is available free of charge on the ACS Publications website at DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.5b01697.

    • Summary of the methods used to construct county-level commodity flows and life-cycle GHG emission factors (PDF)

    Terms & Conditions

    Most electronic Supporting Information files are available without a subscription to ACS Web Editions. Such files may be downloaded by article for research use (if there is a public use license linked to the relevant article, that license may permit other uses). Permission may be obtained from ACS for other uses through requests via the RightsLink permission system: http://pubs.acs.org/page/copyright/permissions.html.

    Cited By

    This article is cited by 8 publications.

    1. Nemi Vora, Colin Gillen, Oleg A. Prokopyev, Vikas Khanna. Rewiring the Domestic U.S. Rice Trade for Reducing Irrigation Impacts—Implications for the Food–Energy–Water Nexus. ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering 2021, 9 (28) , 9188-9198. https://doi.org/10.1021/acssuschemeng.1c00776
    2. Nemi Vora, Brian D. Fath, Vikas Khanna. A Systems Approach To Assess Trade Dependencies in U.S. Food–Energy–Water Nexus. Environmental Science & Technology 2019, 53 (18) , 10941-10950. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.8b07288
    3. Isabella M Gee, Kasey M Faust, Michael E Webber. A framework for determining energy use in rural food delivery services: capturing system interdependencies through an agent-based discrete-event approach. Environmental Research: Infrastructure and Sustainability 2021, 1 (3) , 035002. https://doi.org/10.1088/2634-4505/ac2b10
    4. Fan Tong, Derek Wolfson, Alan Jenn, Corinne D Scown, Maximilian Auffhammer. Energy consumption and charging load profiles from long-haul truck electrification in the United States. Environmental Research: Infrastructure and Sustainability 2021, 1 (2) , 025007. https://doi.org/10.1088/2634-4505/ac186a
    5. Yuwei Qin, Arpad Horvath. Contribution of food loss to greenhouse gas assessment of high-value agricultural produce: California production, U.S. consumption. Environmental Research Letters 2021, 16 (1) , 014024. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/abcfdf
    6. Eric M Bell, Arpad Horvath. Modeling the carbon footprint of fresh produce: effects of transportation, localness, and seasonality on US orange markets. Environmental Research Letters 2020, 15 (3) , 034040. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab6c2f
    7. Michael N Taptich, Corinne D Scown, Kate Piscopo, Arpad Horvath. Drop-in biofuels offer strategies for meeting California’s 2030 climate mandate. Environmental Research Letters 2018, 13 (9) , 094018. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aadcb2
    8. Lynn H Kaack, Parth Vaishnav, M Granger Morgan, Inês L Azevedo, Srijana Rai. Decarbonizing intraregional freight systems with a focus on modal shift. Environmental Research Letters 2018, 13 (8) , 083001. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aad56c

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    You’ve supercharged your research process with ACS and Mendeley!

    STEP 1:
    Click to create an ACS ID

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    MENDELEY PAIRING EXPIRED
    Your Mendeley pairing has expired. Please reconnect