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Aqueous Mesocosm Techniques Enabling the Real-Time Measurement of the Chemical and Isotopic Kinetics of Dissolved Methane and Carbon Dioxide

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Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, United States
Department of Marine Science, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, Mississippi 39529, United States
§ Vermont EPSCoR, University of Vermont Burlington, Vermont 05405,United States
Pactech Packaging, LLC, Rochester, New York 14624, United States
Cite this: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2016, 50, 6, 3039–3046
Publication Date (Web):February 26, 2016
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b04304
Copyright © 2016 American Chemical Society

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    Abstract

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    Previous studies of microbially mediated methane oxidation in oceanic environments have examined the many different factors that control the rates of oxidation. However, there is debate on what factor(s) are limiting in these types of environments. These factors include the availability of methane, O2, trace metals, nutrients, the density of cell population, and the influence that CO2 production may have on pH. To look at this process in its entirety, we developed an automated mesocosm incubation system with a Dissolved Gas Analysis System (DGAS) coupled to a myriad of analytical tools to monitor chemical changes during methane oxidation. Here, we present new high temporal resolution techniques for investigating dissolved methane and carbon dioxide concentrations and stable isotopic dynamics during aqueous mesocosm and pure culture incubations. These techniques enable us to analyze the gases dissolved in solution and are nondestructive to both the liquid media and the analyzed gases enabling the investigation of a mesocosm or pure culture experiment in a completely closed system, if so desired.

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    • Pictures of the DGAS unit and the components as well as additional information for the characterization of the equilibrators tested in the DGAS unit (PDF)

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    Cited By

    This article is cited by 7 publications.

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    2. Zachary W. Hudspeth, Joshua L. Morningstar, Howard P. Mendlovitz, Jennifer A. Baily, Karen G. Lloyd, Christopher S. Martens. In situ aerobic methane oxidation rates in a stratified lake. Limnology and Oceanography 2024, https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.12583
    3. Sydney I. Louden, John D. Kessler. The emission of low pH water from Gulf of Mexico seeps as revealed by δ 13 C–CO 2 and methane oxidation data. Environmental Science: Advances 2023, 2 (11) , 1600-1606. https://doi.org/10.1039/D3VA00117B
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    5. E. W. Chan, A. M. Shiller, D. J. Joung, E. C. Arrington, D. L. Valentine, M. C. Redmond, J. A. Breier, S. A. Socolofsky, J. D. Kessler. Investigations of Aerobic Methane Oxidation in Two Marine Seep Environments: Part 2—Isotopic Kinetics. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 2019, 124 (11) , 8392-8399. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JC015603
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