ACS Publications. Most Trusted. Most Cited. Most Read
My Activity
CONTENT TYPES

Figure 1Loading Img
RETURN TO ISSUEPREVEnergy and ClimateNEXT

Resolving Nanoscale Processes during Carbon Mineralization Using Identical Location Transmission Electron Microscopy

Cite this: Environ. Sci. Technol. Lett. 2024, 11, 2, 79–88
Publication Date (Web):December 5, 2023
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.estlett.3c00699
Copyright © 2023 American Chemical Society

    Article Views

    759

    Altmetric

    -

    Citations

    -
    LEARN ABOUT THESE METRICS
    Other access options
    Supporting Info (1)»

    Abstract

    Abstract Image

    Basalt reservoirs offer the potential for carbon mineralization, aiding in achieving net-zero emissions. However, debates persist about microscopic crystallization mechanisms due to limited characterization techniques under high-temperature and pressure conditions. By using Identical Location Transmission Electron Microscopy (IL-TEM) and cryo-TEM, this study reveals nanoscale interfacial carbonation processes of forsterite and diopside nanoparticles in water-saturated supercritical carbon dioxide under realistic reservoir conditions. Both minerals undergo preferential metal cation dissolution into a thin water film, forming porous Si-rich amorphous layers, supporting the leached layer mechanism as the dominant mineral reactivity process. Diopside’s amorphous layer has lower porosity and growth rate relative to forsterite, likely related to the connectivity of silicate tetrahedra. Kinetically favorable nesquehonite and aragonite nanocrystals form on the amorphous layers. These findings support the development of accurate reservoir simulations and help enable commercial-scale carbon storage deployment.

    Read this article

    To access this article, please review the available access options below.

    Get instant access

    Purchase Access

    Read this article for 48 hours. Check out below using your ACS ID or as a guest.

    Recommended

    Access through Your Institution

    You may have access to this article through your institution.

    Your institution does not have access to this content. You can change your affiliated institution below.

    Supporting Information

    ARTICLE SECTIONS
    Jump To

    The Supporting Information is available free of charge at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.estlett.3c00699.

    • Additional TEM images of forsterite and diopside nanoparticles (PDF)

    Terms & Conditions

    Most electronic Supporting Information files are available without a subscription to ACS Web Editions. Such files may be downloaded by article for research use (if there is a public use license linked to the relevant article, that license may permit other uses). Permission may be obtained from ACS for other uses through requests via the RightsLink permission system: http://pubs.acs.org/page/copyright/permissions.html.

    Cited By

    This article has not yet been cited by other publications.

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    You’ve supercharged your research process with ACS and Mendeley!

    STEP 1:
    Click to create an ACS ID

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    MENDELEY PAIRING EXPIRED
    Your Mendeley pairing has expired. Please reconnect