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Detergent Desorption of Membrane Proteins Exhibits Two Kinetic Phases

  • Aaron J. Wolfe
    Aaron J. Wolfe
    Department of Physics, Syracuse University, 201 Physics Building, Syracuse, New York 13244-1130, United States
    Structural Biology, Biochemistry, and Biophysics Program, Syracuse University, 111 College Place, Syracuse, New York 13244-4100, United States
  • Jack F. Gugel
    Jack F. Gugel
    Department of Physics, Syracuse University, 201 Physics Building, Syracuse, New York 13244-1130, United States
  • Min Chen
    Min Chen
    Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 820 LGRT, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-9336, United States
    More by Min Chen
  • , and 
  • Liviu Movileanu*
    Liviu Movileanu
    Department of Physics, Syracuse University, 201 Physics Building, Syracuse, New York 13244-1130, United States
    Structural Biology, Biochemistry, and Biophysics Program, Syracuse University, 111 College Place, Syracuse, New York 13244-4100, United States
    Department of Biomedical and Chemical Engineering, Syracuse University, 223 Link Hall, Syracuse, New York 13244, United States
    *Tel: 315-443-8078. Fax: 315-443-9103. E-mail: [email protected]
Cite this: J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2018, 9, 8, 1913–1919
Publication Date (Web):March 29, 2018
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpclett.8b00549
Copyright © 2018 American Chemical Society

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    Abstract

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    Gradual dissociation of detergent molecules from water-insoluble membrane proteins culminates in protein aggregation. However, the time-dependent trajectory of this process remains ambiguous because the signal-to-noise ratio of most spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques is drastically declined by the presence of protein aggregates in solution. We show that by using steady-state fluorescence polarization (FP) spectroscopy the dissociation of the protein–detergent complex (PDC) can be inspected in real time at detergent concentrations below the critical micelle concentration. This article provides experimental evidence of the coexistence of two distinct phases of the dissociations of detergent monomers from membrane proteins. We first noted a slow detergent predesolvation process, which was accompanied by a relatively modest change in the FP anisotropy, suggesting a small number of dissociated detergent monomers from the proteomicelles. This predesolvation phase was followed by a fast detergent desolvation process, which was highlighted by a major alteration in the FP anisotropy. The durations and rates of these phases were dependent on both the detergent concentration and the interfacial PDC interactions. Further development of this approach might lead to the creation of a new semiquantitative method for the assessment of the kinetics of association and dissociation of proteomicelles.

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    The Supporting Information is available free of charge on the ACS Publications website at DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpclett.8b00549.

    • (i) Properties of the membrane proteins used in this work; (ii) properties of the detergents used in this work; (iii) detailed graphical presentation of the fits of the predesolvation and desolvation phases; (iv) results of the fits of the predesolvation phase; (v) results of the fits of the desolvation phase; and (vi) dependence of the observed desolvation rates on the detergent concentration. (PDF)

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    Cited By

    This article is cited by 5 publications.

    1. Jiaxin Sun, Avinash Kumar Thakur, Liviu Movileanu. Protein Ligand-Induced Amplification in the 1/f Noise of a Protein-Selective Nanopore. Langmuir 2020, 36 (50) , 15247-15257. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.0c02498
    2. Aaron J. Wolfe, Jack F. Gugel, Min Chen, Liviu Movileanu. Kinetics of Membrane Protein–Detergent Interactions Depend on Protein Electrostatics. The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 2018, 122 (41) , 9471-9481. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcb.8b07889
    3. Chen-Yan Zhang, Shi-Qi Zhao, Shi-Long Zhang, Li-Heng Luo, Ding-Chang Liu, Wei-Hang Ding, Dong-Jie Fu, Xu-Dong Deng, Da-Chuan Yin. Database Study on the Expression and Purification of Membrane Proteins. Protein & Peptide Letters 2021, 28 (9) , 972-982. https://doi.org/10.2174/0929866528666210415120234
    4. Ali Imran, Brandon S. Moyer, Ashley J. Canning, Dan Kalina, Thomas M. Duncan, Kelsey J. Moody, Aaron J. Wolfe, Michael S. Cosgrove, Liviu Movileanu. Kinetics of the multitasking high-affinity Win binding site of WDR5 in restricted and unrestricted conditions. Biochemical Journal 2021, 478 (11) , 2145-2161. https://doi.org/10.1042/BCJ20210253
    5. Aaron J. Wolfe, Kyle J. Parella, Liviu Movileanu. High‐Throughput Screening of Protein‐Detergent Complexes Using Fluorescence Polarization Spectroscopy. Current Protocols in Protein Science 2019, 97 (1) https://doi.org/10.1002/cpps.96

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