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Atom-by-Atom Direct Writing

  • Ondrej Dyck*
    Ondrej Dyck
    Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, United States
    *Email: [email protected]
    More by Ondrej Dyck
  • Andrew R. Lupini
    Andrew R. Lupini
    Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, United States
  • , and 
  • Stephen Jesse
    Stephen Jesse
    Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, United States
Cite this: Nano Lett. 2023, 23, 6, 2339–2346
Publication Date (Web):March 6, 2023
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.3c00114
Copyright © 2023 American Chemical Society

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    Abstract

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    Direct-write processes enable the alteration or deposition of materials in a continuous, directable, sequential fashion. In this work, we demonstrate an electron beam direct-write process in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. This process has several fundamental differences from conventional electron-beam-induced deposition techniques, where the electron beam dissociates precursor gases into chemically reactive products that bond to a substrate. Here, we use elemental tin (Sn) as a precursor and employ a different mechanism to facilitate deposition. The atomic-sized electron beam is used to generate chemically reactive point defects at desired locations in a graphene substrate. Temperature control of the sample is used to enable the precursor atoms to migrate across the surface and bond to the defect sites, thereby enabling atom-by-atom direct writing.

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    • Preparation and characterization methods of the graphene sample (PDF)

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