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Preparation of Mycelium Pulp from Mushroom Fruiting Bodies

  • Hiroya Nakauchi
    Hiroya Nakauchi
    Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553, Japan
  • Yoshihiko Amano
    Yoshihiko Amano
    Institute of Engineering, Academic Assembly, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553, Japan
  • , and 
  • Satomi Tagawa*
    Satomi Tagawa
    Institute of Engineering, Academic Assembly, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553, Japan
    *Email: [email protected]
Cite this: ACS Sustainable Chem. Eng. 2023, 11, 44, 15789–15794
Publication Date (Web):October 21, 2023
https://doi.org/10.1021/acssuschemeng.3c04795
Copyright © 2023 The Authors. Published by American Chemical Society

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    Abstract

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    We developed a new method to extract mycelial fibers, without destroying their structure, from the fruiting bodies of mushrooms. After chemical treatment with NaOH and H2O2, the fruiting bodies were decolorized via an environmentally friendly method using sunlight irradiation. The visible light reflectance of decolorized fruiting bodies was more than 80%. Ultrasonic treatment was used to defibrillate the fruiting bodies at the mycelial level, and a white micrometer-sized dispersion of mycelial fibers (mycelium pulp) was obtained. The mycelium retained its structure, demonstrating a thick linear mycelium pulp (width: 8.0 ± 3.4 μm) in Flammulina velutipes and a thin branched mycelium pulp (width: 2.3 ± 0.6 μm) in Ganoderma lucidum. The mycelium pulp is a completely new material that maintains its mycelial structure, unlike previously reported materials derived from fruiting bodies. The mycelium pulp demonstrates excellent deformability and can be used to create one- to three-dimensional deformable products, showing a wide range of material applicability.

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    The Supporting Information is available free of charge at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acssuschemeng.3c04795.

    • Details of materials and methods, summary of characteristics of this study and previous studies (Figure S1), effect of chemical treatment on fruiting body decolorization and defibrillation (Figure S2), FE-SEM and fluorescence microscopy images before defibrillation (Figure S3), FE-SEM image of thin fibers generated from surface of G. lucidum mycelium pulp (Figure S4), close-up ATR-FTIR spectra and second derivative ATR-FTIR spectra (Figure S5), and photos of yarns, films, and sponges made from mycelium pulp (Figure S6) (PDF)

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