ACS Publications. Most Trusted. Most Cited. Most Read
My Activity
CONTENT TYPES

Quantitative Modeling of Soil Chemical Data from Inductively Coupled Plasma—Optical Emission Spectroscopy Reveals Evidence for Cooking and Eating in Ancient Mesoamerican Plazas

  • E. Christian Wells
    E. Christian Wells
    Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620
  • Claire Novotny
    Claire Novotny
    Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620
  • , and 
  • James R. Hawken
    James R. Hawken
    Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620
DOI: 10.1021/bk-2007-0968.ch011
    Publication Date (Print):August 16, 2007
    Copyright © 2007 American Chemical Society.
    Archaeological Chemistry
    Chapter 11pp 210-230
    ACS Symposium SeriesVol. 968
    ISBN13: 9780841274136eISBN: 9780841220928

    Chapter Views

    131

    Citations

    LEARN ABOUT THESE METRICS

    Chapter Views are the COUNTER-compliant sum of full text article downloads since November 2008 (both PDF and HTML) across all institutions and individuals. These metrics are regularly updated to reflect usage leading up to the last few days.

    Citations are the number of other articles citing this article, calculated by Crossref and updated daily. Find more information about Crossref citation counts.

    Other access options
    SUBJECTS:

    Abstract

    Recent advances in archaeological soil chemistry provide new ways to examine the use of space where little or no material evidence persists. Drawing on ethnoarchaeological studies, which demonstrate that certain human activities chemically impact soils, this paper compares the results of chemical analyses of soils from two plazas in a prehispanic settlement in Honduras. Chemical compounds were extracted from the surfaces of soil particles using a mild extractant composed of hydrochloric and nitric acids and then characterized using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. Exploratory data analysis and geostatistics allowed the chemical data to be spatialized across the plaza surfaces. When combined with associated artifact data, the chemical information suggests that the plazas were used, in part, for the preparation and consumption of foods and beverages.

    Read this chapter

    To access this chapter, please review the available access options below.

    Get instant access

    Purchase Access

    Read this chapter for 48 hours. Check out below using your ACS ID or as a guest.

    Recommended

    Access through Your Institution

    You may have access to this chapter through your institution.

    Your institution does not have access to this content. You can change your affiliated institution below.

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    You’ve supercharged your research process with ACS and Mendeley!

    STEP 1:
    Click to create an ACS ID

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    MENDELEY PAIRING EXPIRED
    Your Mendeley pairing has expired. Please reconnect