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Predicting Spatial Variations in Multiple Measures of Oxidative Burden for Outdoor Fine Particulate Air Pollution across Canada

  • Jun-Wei Xu*
    Jun-Wei Xu
    Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada
    *Email: [email protected]. Phone: (+1) 902-817-9937.
    More by Jun-Wei Xu
  • Randall V. Martin
    Randall V. Martin
    Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States
    Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada
    Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States
  • Greg J. Evans
    Greg J. Evans
    Southern Ontario Centre for Atmospheric Aerosol Research, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E5, Canada
    Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 480 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1V2, Canada
  • Dana Umbrio
    Dana Umbrio
    Southern Ontario Centre for Atmospheric Aerosol Research, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E5, Canada
    More by Dana Umbrio
  • Alison Traub
    Alison Traub
    Southern Ontario Centre for Atmospheric Aerosol Research, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E5, Canada
    More by Alison Traub
  • Jun Meng
    Jun Meng
    Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada
    More by Jun Meng
  • Aaron van Donkelaar
    Aaron van Donkelaar
    Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada
    Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States
  • Hongyu You
    Hongyu You
    Air Health Science Division, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K0, Canada
    More by Hongyu You
  • Ryan Kulka
    Ryan Kulka
    Air Health Science Division, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K0, Canada
    More by Ryan Kulka
  • Richard T. Burnett
    Richard T. Burnett
    Population Studies Division, Health Canada, 101 Tunney’s Pasture Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, Canada
  • Krystal J. Godri Pollitt
    Krystal J. Godri Pollitt
    Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, 60 College Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, United States
  • , and 
  • Scott Weichenthal
    Scott Weichenthal
    Air Health Science Division, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K0, Canada
    Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, 1020 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 1A2, Canada
Cite this: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2021, 55, 14, 9750–9760
Publication Date (Web):July 9, 2021
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.1c01210
Copyright © 2021 American Chemical Society

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    Abstract

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    Fine particulate air pollution (PM2.5) is a leading contributor to the overall global burden of disease. Traditionally, outdoor PM2.5 has been characterized using mass concentrations which treat all particles as equally harmful. Oxidative potential (OP) (per μg) and oxidative burden (OB) (per m3) are complementary metrics that estimate the ability of PM2.5 to cause oxidative stress, which is an important mechanism in air pollution health effects. Here, we provide the first national estimates of spatial variations in multiple measures (glutathione, ascorbate, and dithiothreitol depletion) of annual median outdoor PM2.5 OB across Canada. To do this, we combined a large database of ground-level OB measurements collected monthly prospectively across Canada for 2 years (2016–2018) with PM2.5 components estimated using a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and satellite aerosol observations. Our predicted ground-level OB values of all three methods were consistent with ground-level observations (cross-validation R2 = 0.63–0.74). We found that forested regions and urban areas had the highest OB, predicted primarily by black carbon and organic carbon from wildfires and transportation sources. Importantly, the dominant components associated with OB were different than those contributing to PM2.5 mass concentrations (secondary inorganic aerosol); thus, OB metrics may better indicate harmful components and sources on health than the bulk PM2.5 mass, reinforcing that OB estimates can complement the existing PM2.5 data in future national-level epidemiological studies.

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    The Supporting Information is available free of charge at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.est.1c01210.

    • Details of hybrid PM2.5 and composition concentrations; relationships of OB and hybrid concentrations; source contributions to hybrid BC and OC concentrations; mass fractions of chemical composition in hybrid PM2.5 concentrations; and OB spatial distributions over the United States (PDF)

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    Cited By

    This article is cited by 5 publications.

    1. Chunbo Xing, Yixiang Wang, Xin Yang, Yaling Zeng, Jinghao Zhai, Baohua Cai, Antai Zhang, Tzung-May Fu, Lei Zhu, Ying Li, Xinming Wang, Yanli Zhang. Seasonal variation of driving factors of ambient PM2.5 oxidative potential in Shenzhen, China. Science of The Total Environment 2023, 862 , 160771. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.160771
    2. Hind A. Al-Abadleh, James D. Kubicki, Nicholas Meskhidze. A perspective on iron (Fe) in the atmosphere: air quality, climate, and the ocean. Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts 2023, 25 (2) , 151-164. https://doi.org/10.1039/D2EM00176D
    3. Benedetto Schiavo, Diana Meza-Figueroa, Efrain Vizuete-Jaramillo, Agustin Robles-Morua, Aracely Angulo-Molina, Pablo A. Reyes-Castro, Claudio Inguaggiato, Belem Gonzalez-Grijalva, Martin Pedroza-Montero. Oxidative potential of metal-polluted urban dust as a potential environmental stressor for chronic diseases. Environmental Geochemistry and Health 2022, 42 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10653-022-01403-9
    4. Li Gao, Jie‐Xing Qin, Jian‐Quan Shi, Teng Jiang, Fei Wang, Chong Xie, Qing Gao, Nan Zhi, Qing Dong, Yang‐Tai Guan. Fine particulate matter exposure aggravates ischemic injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation and pyroptosis. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics 2022, 28 (7) , 1045-1058. https://doi.org/10.1111/cns.13837
    5. Adam Schuller, Ethan S. Walker, Jaclyn M. Goodrich, Matthew Lundgren, Luke Montrose. Indoor Air Quality Considerations for Laboratory Animals in Wildfire-Impacted Regions—A Pilot Study. Toxics 2022, 10 (7) , 387. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10070387

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