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A New Cathode Material for a Li–O2 Battery Based on Lithium Superoxide

  • Samuel T. Plunkett
    Samuel T. Plunkett
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607, United States
    Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
  • Alireza Kondori
    Alireza Kondori
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60439, United States
  • Duck Young Chung
    Duck Young Chung
    Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
  • Jianguo Wen
    Jianguo Wen
    The Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
    More by Jianguo Wen
  • Mark Wolfman
    Mark Wolfman
    Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
    More by Mark Wolfman
  • Saul H. Lapidus
    Saul H. Lapidus
    X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
  • Yang Ren
    Yang Ren
    X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
    More by Yang Ren
  • Rachid Amine
    Rachid Amine
    Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
    More by Rachid Amine
  • Khalil Amine
    Khalil Amine
    Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
    More by Khalil Amine
  • Anil U. Mane
    Anil U. Mane
    Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
    More by Anil U. Mane
  • Mohammad Asadi
    Mohammad Asadi
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60439, United States
  • Said Al-Hallaj
    Said Al-Hallaj
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607, United States
  • Brian P. Chaplin
    Brian P. Chaplin
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607, United States
  • Kah Chun Lau*
    Kah Chun Lau
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Northridge, California 91330, United States
    *Email for K.C.L.: [email protected]
    More by Kah Chun Lau
  • Hsien-Hau Wang*
    Hsien-Hau Wang
    Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
    *Email for H.-H.W.: [email protected]
  • , and 
  • Larry A. Curtiss*
    Larry A. Curtiss
    Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States
    *Email for L.A.C.: [email protected]
Cite this: ACS Energy Lett. 2022, 7, 8, 2619–2626
Publication Date (Web):July 19, 2022
https://doi.org/10.1021/acsenergylett.2c01191
Copyright © 2022 UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory. Published by American Chemical Society

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    Abstract

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    Li–O2 batteries suffer from large charge overpotentials due to the high charge transfer resistance of Li2O2 discharge products. A potential solution to this problem is the development of LiO2-based batteries that possess low charge overpotentials due to the lower charge transfer resistance of LiO2. In this report, IrLi nanoparticles were synthesized and implemented for the first time as a LiO2 battery cathode material. The IrLi nanoparticle synthesis was achieved by a temperature- and time-optimized thermal reaction between a precise ratio of iridium nanoparticles and lithium metal. Li–O2 batteries employing the IrLi-rGO cathodes were cycled up to 100 cycles at moderate current densities with sustained low cell charge potentials (<3.5 V). Various characterization techniques, including SEM, DEMS, TEM, Raman, and titration, were used to demonstrate the LiO2 discharge product and the absence of Li2O2. On the basis of first-principles calculations, it was concluded that the formation of crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized by epitaxial growth on the (111) facets of IrLi nanoparticles present on the cathode surface. These findings demonstrate that, in addition to the previously studied Ir3Li intermetallic, the IrLi intermetallic also provides a means by which LiO2 discharge products can be stabilized and confirms the importance of templating for the formation process.

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    The Supporting Information is available free of charge at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsenergylett.2c01191.

    • Detailed outline of experimental procedures, a raw material analysis, a supporting IrLi material analysis, a supporting electrochemical analysis of IrLi, a Tafel analysis, a supporting discharge product analysis, a supporting DEMS analysis, and a supporting TEM analysis (PDF)

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    Cited By

    This article is cited by 5 publications.

    1. Chung-Hao Liao, Ching-Yu Chiang, Kevin Iputera, Shu-Fen Hu, Ru-Shi Liu. Homogeneous Catalytic Process of a Heterogeneous Ru Catalyst in Li–O2 via X-ray Nanodiffraction Observation. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2024, 16 (7) , 8783-8790. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.3c16966
    2. Li-Na Song, Li-Jun Zheng, Xiao-Xue Wang, De-Chen Kong, Yi-Feng Wang, Yue Wang, Jia-Yi Wu, Yu Sun, Ji-Jing Xu. Aprotic Lithium–Oxygen Batteries Based on Nonsolid Discharge Products. Journal of the American Chemical Society 2024, 146 (2) , 1305-1317. https://doi.org/10.1021/jacs.3c08656
    3. Mihui Park, Seonyong Cho, Junghoon Yang, Vincent Wing-hei Lau, Kwang Hee Kim, Jong Hyeok Park, Stefan Ringe, Yong-Mook Kang. Heterogeneous Catalyst as a Functional Substrate Governing the Shape of Electrochemical Precipitates in Oxygen-Fueled Rechargeable Batteries. Journal of the American Chemical Society 2023, 145 (28) , 15425-15434. https://doi.org/10.1021/jacs.3c03619
    4. Shiquan Guo, Jiaona Wang, Yaxin Sun, Lichong Peng, Congju Li. Interface engineering of Co3O4/CeO2 heterostructure in-situ embedded in Co/N‑doped carbon nanofibers integrating oxygen vacancies as effective oxygen cathode catalyst for Li-O2 battery. Chemical Engineering Journal 2023, 452 , 139317. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2022.139317
    5. Liqin Wang, Youcai Lu, Mengran Xie, Shaoze Zhao, Zhongjun Li, Qingchao Liu. Interfacially engineered induced nickel-based heterostructures as efficient catalysts for Li-O2 batteries. Electrochimica Acta 2023, 437 , 141476. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.electacta.2022.141476

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