Pair your accounts.

Export articles to Mendeley

Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

Pair your accounts.

Export articles to Mendeley

Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

You’ve supercharged your research process with ACS and Mendeley!

STEP 1:
Click to create an ACS ID

Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

MENDELEY PAIRING EXPIRED
Your Mendeley pairing has expired. Please reconnect

2-D MATERIALS

MXenes sense gas maximally

Mitch Jacoby
C&EN, 2018, 96 (6), p 11February 5, 2018

Abstract

Abstract Image

Gas sensors have long served critical roles in industrial applications, including monitoring air quality and engine emissions. Analyzing volatile organic compounds in breath to screen for disease markers is a developing application that is being advanced by highly sensitive “homemade” gas sensors, often based on semiconducting oxides, nanomaterials, and two-dimensional materials. That field may advance even more quickly now thanks to a study showing that a titanium carbide MXene compound can be fashioned into a gas sensor that provides part-per-billion-level sensitivity and record-setting signal-to-noise ratios (ACS Nano 2018, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.7b07460). Various 2-D materials, including black phosphorus and molybdenum disulfide, rank among the top-performing gas-sensing media. That motivated a team led by Hee-Tae Jung of Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology and Yury Gogotsi of Drexel University to see how MXenes, a family of 2-D metal carbides and nitrides, stack up in that application. Head-to-head comparisons in tests with acetone,

To access the full text, please choose an option below.

Get Access To This article