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Accumulation of Antifreeze Proteins on Ice Is Determined by Adsorption

  • Aniket U. Thosar
    Aniket U. Thosar
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States
  • Yitzhar Shalom
    Yitzhar Shalom
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016, United States
    Department of Physics, Katz School of Science and Health, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016, United States
  • Ido Braslavsky
    Ido Braslavsky
    The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 7610001, Israel
  • Ran Drori*
    Ran Drori
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016, United States
    Department of Physics, Katz School of Science and Health, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016, United States
    *Email: [email protected]
    More by Ran Drori
  • , and 
  • Amish J. Patel*
    Amish J. Patel
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States
    *Email: [email protected]
Cite this: J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2023, 145, 32, 17597–17602
Publication Date (Web):August 1, 2023
https://doi.org/10.1021/jacs.3c02705
Copyright © 2023 American Chemical Society

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    Abstract

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    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) facilitate the survival of diverse organisms in frigid environments by adsorbing to ice crystals and suppressing their growth. The rate of AFP accumulation on ice is determined by an interplay between AFP diffusion from the bulk solution to the ice–water interface and the subsequent adsorption of AFPs to the interface. To interrogate the relative importance of these two processes, here, we combine nonequilibrium fluorescence experiments with a reaction–diffusion model. We find that as diverse AFPs accumulate on ice, their concentration in the aqueous solution does not develop a gradient but remains equal to its bulk concentration throughout our experiments. These findings lead us to conclude that AFP accumulation on ice crystals, which are smaller than 100 μm in radius, is not limited by the diffusion of AFPs, but by the kinetics of AFP adsorption. Our results imply that mass transport limitations do not hinder AFPs from performing their biological function.

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    The Supporting Information is available free of charge at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jacs.3c02705.

    • Experimental details; theoretical derivations that elaborate upon the implications of eqs 3 and 4 in certain limits; and experimental results (Figures S1–S3) (PDF)

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    Cited By

    This article is cited by 1 publications.

    1. Vera Sirotinskaya, Maya Bar Dolev, Victor Yashunsky, Liat Bahari, Ido Braslavsky. Extended Temperature Range of the Ice-Binding Protein Activity. Langmuir 2024, 40 (14) , 7395-7404. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.3c03710

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