ACS Publications. Most Trusted. Most Cited. Most Read
My Activity
CONTENT TYPES

Figure 1Loading Img

Solvent Isotope Effects on the Creation of Fluorescent Quantum Defects in Carbon Nanotubes by Aryl Diazonium Chemistry

  • Brandon J. Heppe
    Brandon J. Heppe
    Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Washkewicz College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115, United States
  • Nina Dzombic
    Nina Dzombic
    Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Washkewicz College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115, United States
    More by Nina Dzombic
  • Joseph M. Keil
    Joseph M. Keil
    Department of Chemistry, Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease (GRHD), Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115, United States
  • Xue-Long Sun*
    Xue-Long Sun
    Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Washkewicz College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115, United States
    Department of Chemistry, Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease (GRHD), Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115, United States
    *[email protected]
    More by Xue-Long Sun
  • , and 
  • Geyou Ao*
    Geyou Ao
    Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Washkewicz College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115, United States
    *[email protected]
    More by Geyou Ao
Cite this: J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2023, 145, 47, 25621–25631
Publication Date (Web):November 16, 2023
https://doi.org/10.1021/jacs.3c07341
Copyright © 2023 American Chemical Society

    Article Views

    963

    Altmetric

    -

    Citations

    -
    LEARN ABOUT THESE METRICS
    Other access options
    Supporting Info (1)»

    Abstract

    Abstract Image

    The integration of aryl diazonium and carbon nanotube chemistries has offered rich and versatile tools for creating nanomaterials of unique optical and electronic properties in a controllable fashion. The diazonium reaction with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is known to proceed through a radical or carbocation mechanism in aqueous solutions, with deuterated water (D2O) being the frequently used solvent. Here, we show strong water solvent isotope effects on the aryl diazonium reaction with SWCNTs for creating fluorescent quantum defects using water (H2O) and D2O. We found a deduced reaction constant of ∼18.2 times larger value in D2O than in H2O, potentially due to their different chemical properties. We also observed the generation of new defect photoluminescence over a broad concentration range of diazonium reactants in H2O, as opposed to a narrow window of reaction conditions in D2O under UV excitation. Without UV light, the physical adsorption of diazonium on the surface of SWCNTs led to the fluorescence quenching of nanotubes. These findings provide important insights into the aryl diazonium chemistry with carbon nanotubes for creating promising material platforms for optical sensing, imaging, and quantum communication technologies.

    Read this article

    To access this article, please review the available access options below.

    Get instant access

    Purchase Access

    Read this article for 48 hours. Check out below using your ACS ID or as a guest.

    Recommended

    Access through Your Institution

    You may have access to this article through your institution.

    Your institution does not have access to this content. You can change your affiliated institution below.

    Supporting Information

    ARTICLE SECTIONS
    Jump To

    The Supporting Information is available free of charge at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jacs.3c07341.

    • Spectroscopic characterization of SWCNT samples, 1H NMR and absorbance spectra of diazonium salts, calculation of the total length of SWCNTs in solution, and supplementary tables (PDF)

    Terms & Conditions

    Electronic Supporting Information files are available without a subscription to ACS Web Editions. The American Chemical Society holds a copyright ownership interest in any copyrightable Supporting Information. Files available from the ACS website may be downloaded for personal use only. Users are not otherwise permitted to reproduce, republish, redistribute, or sell any Supporting Information from the ACS website, either in whole or in part, in either machine-readable form or any other form without permission from the American Chemical Society. For permission to reproduce, republish and redistribute this material, requesters must process their own requests via the RightsLink permission system. Information about how to use the RightsLink permission system can be found at http://pubs.acs.org/page/copyright/permissions.html.

    Cited By

    This article has not yet been cited by other publications.

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    Pair your accounts.

    Export articles to Mendeley

    Get article recommendations from ACS based on references in your Mendeley library.

    You’ve supercharged your research process with ACS and Mendeley!

    STEP 1:
    Click to create an ACS ID

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    Please note: If you switch to a different device, you may be asked to login again with only your ACS ID.

    MENDELEY PAIRING EXPIRED
    Your Mendeley pairing has expired. Please reconnect